ZERO - Research on ascorbic acid inhalation

Published : 2020-07-02 - Categories :

In October 1993, a group of researchers conducted clinical trials using nebulized ascorbic acid to help quit smoking.

L-ascorbic acid is one of the components of the vitamin C complex.

In a recent study, two clinical trials were conducted using an aerosol of ascorbic acid as a sensory substitute.

Study 1 examined the overall efficacy of ascorbic acid using a replacement device.

The replacement cigarette consists of a tube of the same size that releases an aerosol of ascorbic acid (about 1mg / puff, up to a maximum of 300mg / day). The study was conducted for 3 weeks, showing that the subjects did not show any abstinence after they stopped using the device.

Study 2 was conducted with a specific focus on the role of tracheobronchial sensations in relieving cravings.

Two different ways of administering ascorbic acid have been compared.

One device emits fine particles of ascorbic acid with the goal of reaching the trachea, while the other device emits coarser particles without the goal of reaching the trachea or lower airways.

An initial increase in smoke reduction was found in users of the device emitting fine particles compared to the device emitting coarser particles.

At the end of treatment (5 weeks) both groups showed similar decreases to the reduction in the need to smoke.

Users of the device emitting fine particles also found a reduction in craving for cigarettes and negative mood, but also a reduction in hunger.

These results suggest that ascorbic acid taken with a replacement cigarette may be effective in reducing smoking abstinence resulting in a reduction in smoking which is considered the largest preventable cause of death in the world.

A STUDY ON THE INHALATION OF ASCORBIC ACID

1993 Oct;33(3):211-23. doi: 10.1016/0376-8716(93)90108-3.

Clinical Trials Using Ascorbic Acid Aerosol to Aid Smoking Cessation

E D Levin  1 , F Behm, E Carnahan, R LeClair, R Shipley, J E Rose

Affiliations expand

PMID: 8261886 DOI: 10.1016/0376-8716(93)90108-3

Abstract

Sensory aspects of cigarette smoke are important for providing smoking satisfaction. In previous studies, we have found that substitution of the sensory cues of smoking with a citric acid aerosol significantly reduces craving for cigarettes and enhances smoking reduction and cessation with people trying to quit smoking cigarettes. In the current study, we conducted two clinical smoking cessation trials using an ascorbic acid aerosol as a sensory substitute. The cigarette substitute consisted of a cigarette-sized tube which delivered a fine aerosol of ascorbic acid (approx. 1 mg/puff, up to a maximum of 300 mg/day). Study 1 examined the overall effectiveness of the ascorbic acid smoking substitute device. One group of subjects which used the device and received clinical counseling was compared with another group which received only clinical counseling. The group using the device showed significantly greater abstinence rates at 3 weeks post-cessation. After the subjects stopped using the device, no difference in abstinence was detected. Study 2 was conducted to focus specifically on the role of tracheobronchial sensations in relieving craving for cigarettes. Two closely matched ascorbic acid delivery systems were compared. One device delivered fine particles of ascorbic acid that were targeted to reach the trachea, while the other delivered coarser particles of ascorbic acid that were not expected to reach the trachea or lower airways. An initial enhancement in smoking reduction was found for subjects using the fine particle device relative to those using the coarse particle device. However, by the end of treatment (5 weeks) both groups showed similar degrees of smoking reduction. For those who were abstinent from smoking at the end of treatment, craving for cigarettes and negative mood were both significantly lower for those using the fine particle device. Also, hunger for food was significantly lower in the fine particle device group. These results suggest that ascorbic acid delivered from a cigarette substitute may be effective in reducing smoking and promoting smoking abstinence.

Vitamins and antioxidants

Smoking is basically associated with the decrease plasma concentration of vitamins (A, E, C) and antioxidants; therefore plasma resistance towards oxidative changes decreases. Studies confirmed that use of natural agents along with pharmacological therapy is very effective in smoking cessation.11 According to different studies smokers usually have a low level of ascorbic acid than non-smokers and more than one year without smoking is required to attain plasma concentrations similar to those of people who have never smoked.12-14 Medicinal herbs like Eugenia aromaticum and Astragalus membranaceus have high antioxidant activity and studies proved that they have an important role in reducing withdrawal symptoms.15 It is also found from studies that daily supplements of Oat extract is beneficial in smoking cessation by reducing the consumption of cigarettes from 20 to fewer than 9.

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